10 Years of City Of Bones (and 10 things Shadowhunters have taught me)!

Hey Ho Bookaholics!

Welcome back to another Storytime Wednesday! It feels like forever since I’ve just sat down at my computer and written a post for this blog.

As of about a week ago, I’ve gotten back on Tumblr – after lots of phone drama – and just yesterday I discovered that it is the 10 year anniversary of the wonderful piece of literature that is City of Bones.

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City Of Bones by Cassandra Clare, Published 2007, Simon & Schuster.

Continue reading “10 Years of City Of Bones (and 10 things Shadowhunters have taught me)!”

Book Review Guidelines.

Hey Ho Bookaholics!

I was writing my review for The Fifth Avenue Artists Society a few days ago and I realised how hard it was to write a review for a book I loved and hold so dear to my heart, so in my plan I broke the review down into three sections and which lead to the construction of this post. I wanted to share with you all the guidelines I use when I review, especially when I’m stuck.

When I review books I like to stick to a few main points. I have listed these points below and I feel that people who read my blog may also review books and potentially benefit from my the advice I have to offer.


 

Don’t review the Author: Don’t review solely on author instead give the author criticism where they astounded you or where you were your expectations were let down upon reading the book. There are some people who don’t actually review the book rather compare it to other

Do not compare genres: Books from different genres cannot be compared as they cannot be reviewed using the same parameters  where the basic area of critique will be the same – characters, plot, writing, etc. – the preppy cheerleader found in a romance novel cannot be compared against a tough-as-nuts crime fighting warrior princess from a science fiction novel

Include negatives a short well as positives (or vice versa) in your review: Do not (or at least try not to) make your reviews biased, as this will not give the potential reader an accurate representation of the book. As all books have their flaws (or something that made you want to finish the book), this should be highlighted as not only a caution to any potentials readers but as constructive criticism to the author and any other authors wishing to better this work; especially if the flaw/ perfection is a general issue.

Break the review down into sections: As seen in my recent review of The Fifth Avenue Artists Society by Joy Callaway I like to break the review down into sections or aspects of the book such as writing style, characters, and plot/storyline. Review each aspect of the book and either place the sections in subheadings or join them into one long review, but I chose to place everything under subheadings as it looks neater.

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These are the typical guidelines I follow for any review I write, I would like to know what guidelines you’ve made for yourself to follow when writing reviews. If you would like to share or provide me with any advice for reviews please comment below as I would love to hear from you!

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Stay Happy, Healthy, and have a Lovely Week!!

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Thank You so much for reading and I hope to see you all back here again Saturday 🙂

BREE XOXO


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© Jasper+Spice 2017. All Rights Reserved. Please do not use without permission. This post was not sponsored, some photos are my own and were featured on my Instagram @thebookishbree. Please follow me on Goodreads (jasperandspice). 

Why Do We Own Multiple Editions of The Same Book??

Hey Ho Bookaholics!

I got this idea from the two copies of Lady Midnight by Cassandra Clare I own. You see, and I’m sure you can all relate; I’ve never read the second copy. I bought the first copy online when it first came out and I read it in 3 days, but when I purchased the second one, it was a cover buy, impulse decision because of how pretty and exclusive the cover was, and also the fact that it was hardback, signed, and had a map! This book now sits on my shelf, and though I am very proud of it, it got me thinking: why do I even have it if I haven’t read that exact copy?

There are multiple reasons why I keep the fist edition of Lady Midnight as well as the second more fancier edition:
– two different cover artworks;
– both are signed;
– I read the first one and it is quite sentimental to me;
– it’s my first ever Cassandra Clare book!

I think it may be the act of owning or even purchasing another book that increases the appeal of having multiple copies of the same story, it gives us the same sense of triumph as collecting a new item in a collection, like Pokemon cards – still the same cardboard card but different Pokemon hence different worth.

What Books Do You Have Multiple Copies Of And Why Do You Keep Them?

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Stay Happy, Healthy, and have a Lovely Night!!

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Thank You so much for reading and I hope to see you all back here again Saturday 🙂

BREE XOXO


I’m a Book Depository Affiliate! Get Free Shipping on ALL BOOKS Everywhere!


© Jasper+Spice 2017. All Rights Reserved. Please do not use without permission. This post was not sponsored, some photos are my own and were featured on my Instagram @thebookishbree. Please follow me on Goodreads (jasperandspice). 

 

What is the Difference Between a Cliche and a Trope?

Hey Ho Bookaholics!

Welcome to the first Stoytime Wednesday, where I attempt to understand the difference between a cliche and a trope.

This confusion came about when I was reading Third Time Lucky by Karly Lane, a book that would never have thought to pick up if it wasn’t sent to me by Allen & Unwin; and I came across many many cheesy cliches and tropes. My favourite trope that appeard in this story was the get good to get back trope, where a charcater who was one shunned by the community comes back years later, rich and living a better life than everyone to rub it in their faces and take their property.

I found a very good explanation on the site dragonscanbebeaten.wordpress.comwhere he quotes Adam Heine who provides the best explanation of tropes and cliches, and how they’re used.

Continue reading “What is the Difference Between a Cliche and a Trope?”